Monday, December 12, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us of the dangers of wealth:
1475. Great treasures bring great miseries. I'm rich, even though I do not have much, because I can enjoy what I have. I don't have any concerns about concealing my wealth from others. The worry about how to hang onto one's money is the worst servitude. (p. 105).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us of the way that God works:
1233. In comparison to the devil, we are nothing, like the seeds of the dandelion, which children blow away. Nevertheless, God triumphs over the devil through weakness [2 Corinthians 12:9]. (p. 254).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how he feels about dreams:
801.I have prayed to God for Him to spare me from dreams' they are deceitful and full of double meanings. He does not have to reveal to me any signs of supernatural powers; I cannot take on the responsibility of interpreting such things, nor is it necessary. for God has already given me His Word, which I now have. That is what I cling to, that is what I believe in. (p. 250).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, November 07, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes the great exchange of the gospel:
5598. In regard to how a faithful soul should talk with Christ, Martin Luther said: I am Your sins, You are my salvation. Therefore I am joyful and without worry. For my sins have no power over your redemption, nor will Your salvation allow me to remain a sinner long. Praise be to God! Amen!  (p. 376).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, October 31, 2011

Mondays with Marty - Reformation Day Edition

Since today is Reformation Day, I have assembled a special collection of clips to celebrate:

Martin Luther at the Diet of Worms (2003 movie edition):




A Reformation Day Polka:




A Reformation Day Rap:




On a more serious note, you can find a listing of the 95 Theses here and a good description of the Five Solas of the Reformation here. Now go celebrate the rediscovery of the Gospel through the Reformation!

Monday, October 24, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes three kinds of people:
5956. There are three types of people: 1. The majority of people, who are completely self-confident and live without the slightest pang of conscience and have no sense of God's wrath. 2. Those whom God has frightened with the Law, who flee and are ringed with dougt, like Paul. 3. Those who in their fear suddenly hear the preaching of the Gospel of merciful forgiveness of sins and accept it.   (pp. 297-98).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the value of music as a balm for melancholy:
3955. The optimum restorer for a depressed individual is music, even when played with very nominal skill. As [Virgil] said: "You raise your horn and blow, I will sing the verse." You sing the notes and I will sing the text.   (p. 139).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, October 10, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther laments the suffering that grain experiences at the hands of people:
851. Grain suffers a lot from people. For first of all, it is thrown onto the ground, so that it will germinate. Finally, when it is grown and ripe, it is cut up or torn out. After that it is threshed and sifted, then we grind it and brew beer or near beer from it, which farmers guzzle and then give it back above and below and tinkle on the fence.  (p. 99).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, October 03, 2011

Mondays with Marty



In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes how a believer should speak to Christ:
3188. If someone laments that he was so troubled by a sermon that he had to leave, comfort him so: "God receives two kinds of offerings, one is praise, and the other is a shattered heart."  (p. 221).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Mondays with Marty


In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes how a believer should speak to Christ:
5598. In regard to how a faithful soul should talk with Christ, Martin Luther said: I am Your sins. You are my salvation. Therefore I am joyful and without worry. For my sins have no power over Your redemption, nor will Your salvation allow me to remain a sinner long. Praise be to God! Amen!  (p. 376).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, September 19, 2011

Mondays with Marty


In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes what lies inside people when they gather for church:
2563a. His wife said: "Oh, it was so full in church that it really stank!" Luther responded: Yes, there certainly is a pile of dirt at times, which is usually hidden within them, and it is always best when they bare their souls.  (p. 333).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Mondays with Marty

This week for Mondays with Marty, Luther explains the importance of knowing the original languages of Scripture:

“In proportion then as we value the gospel, let us zealously hold to the languages.  For it was not without purpose that God caused his Scriptures to be set down in these two languages alone – the Old Testament in Hebrew, the New in Greek.  Now if God did not despise them but chose them above all others for his Word, then we too ought to honor them above all others. . . . Let us be sure of this: we will not long preserve the gospel without the languages.  The languages are the sheath in which this sword of the Spirit is contained; they are the casket in which this jewel is enshrined; they are the vessel in which this wine is held.”


HT: Ray Ortlund, Gospel Coalition

Monday, September 05, 2011

Labor Day


Since today is Labor Day, rather than our usual Mondays with Marty I am reposting something I wrote for Labor Day several years ago:

Today we here in the United States celebrate Labor Day, a holiday originally created in the 1880s to commemorate the efforts of trade and labor organizations. Today, however, the day is largely seen as a final day of vacation that marks the end of the summer. People often celebrate with cookouts or road trips, all of which are great.

But this year Labor Day has provoked me to think about a Biblical view of labor/work. Here in the United States many people regard work as something to be avoided or endured until the next opportunity for recreation. This attitude has resulted in an unbiblical view of retirement as a time to indulge oneself with a life of comfort and leisure. Sadly, such flawed views of work have infiltrated the church, where many have the same view of work that our culture does.

So what then does a biblical understanding of work entail? A blog entry is no place for a fully developed treatment, so all I can offer here are a series of claims about the biblical nature of work that I regard as essential.

1. God created Adam and Eve to work in the Garden (Gen 2:15). Some Christians (whether consciously or unconsciously) have the impression that work is a result of the Fall rather than a part of the created order. But Gen 2:15 makes it clear that God placed Adam in the Garden to "cultivate and keep it" and then created Eve as his helper in the task (Gen 2:18). This work was part of Adam and Eve's mandate to "be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it" (Gen 1:28). So work is part of who God has made us to be; it is part of the original created order that God designated as "very good."

2. Adam and Eve's rebellion resulted in work becoming difficult (Gen 3:17-19). God curses the ground as a result of Adam and Eve's rebellion. Suddenly work became difficult as the curse altered the created order. At the risk of repetition, it must be reiterated that work is not the result of the Fall; it is the difficulty of work in a fallen world that is emphasized.

3. God instructs his people to rest from work regularly (Exod 20:8-11). God establishes the pattern of our work by instructing his people to rest regularly from their work so that they may focus particularly on worshiping him. However one understands the Christian's responsibility to keep the Sabbath, we can all agree that God enjoins his people to rest regularly from their work.

4. All work is to be done for the glory of God and the advancement of his kingdom (Gen 1:27-30; Exod 19:5-6; 1 Cor 10:31; Col 3:23). Although I think this is implied at several points in the OT (particularly the kingdom of priests notion), this principle is most clearly seen in the NT. In Gen 1:27-30, the idea that God creates man in his image is at least in part explain by the task he assigns them. This implies that reflecting God's image is central to a biblical view of work. Paul applies this principle to tasks as mundane as eating and drinking in 1 Cor 10:31, while in Col 3:23 he exhorts his readers to do all work as to the Lord. If the ultimate goal of the kingdom is for the glory of the Lord to cover the earth as the waters cover the sea (Hab 2:14).

5. Christ through his active obedience perfectly accomplished the work the Father gave to him (John 17:4; 19:30). As the Son of God who obeyed where both Adam and Israel failed, Christ did everything his Father commanded. The climax of that work was his sacrificial crucifixion, triumphant resurrection, and glorious ascension that accomplished the redemption of his people and inaugurated his reign.

6. Christ commissioned his followers to work for the advancement of his kingdom until he returns (Matt 28:18-20; John 17:18; 1 Pet 2:9-10). Jesus stressed that he was sending his disciples into the world just as the Father had sent him. After his resurrection Jesus specified the nature of that commission as making disciples, while Peter applies the language of kingdom of priests to believers. These different perspectives all contribute to the reality that Christ commission his followers to work for the advancement of his kingdom in anticipation of his return.

7. In the new heavens and new earth God's people will continue to work (Rev 22:3). In the final chapter of the Bible, John paints a stunning picture of the new heavens and the new earth. One of the lenses he uses is a new Eden. In that new Eden, God's people will serve him. This may come as a shock to some Christians who perceive the eternal state as nothing but recreation. Part of what makes the new heavens and the new earth so beautiful is not the absence of work, but the absence of the curse that makes work difficult. Can you imagine being able to serve the Lord without any hindrance from sin, fatigue, frailty, or anything else that limits our ability to serve God?

I don't claim that this is the last word on a biblical theology of work, but I trust that it may serve as a useful first word. May we all take seriously Paul's words to the Corinthians:
Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your toil is not in vain in the Lord. (1 Cor 15:58)

Monday, August 29, 2011

Mondays with Marty


In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the value of the Psalms:
3416. One should always have the Psalms on hand and constantly and without interruption reflect upon them, because we can never adequately appreciate their splendor unless we read them diligently (p. 343).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, August 22, 2011

Mondays with Marty


In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes the necessity of variety in preaching:
234. A preacher is like a carpenter; his tools are God's Word. Because the audience, upon whom he is to work, is diversified, he should not continuously teach in the same tone, rather, in respect of the differences in his congregation, comfort for a while, frighten, scold, offer reconciliation, and so on. (p. 209).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, August 15, 2011

Mondays with Marty


In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes our tendency towards idols:
3407. Those who don't trust in God, trust in creation; the papists in their works; the pagans in their idols; the greedy in their possessions; others in their princes, and so on. The world wants and insists upon having an idol, for it belongs to the devil, who wants to be so honored. Therefore, do not be disturbed by their ungratefulness and evil, carry on.  (p. 277).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, August 08, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes his dislike of talkative people:
2401. I hate people who talk a lot. Because most of the time, when it sounds like they have something really important to say, they are telling lies. For the truth, however, with which they are rarely acquainted, they use few words. (p. 110).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

When the Going Gets Tough... (Exodus 6:2-27)

This past Sunday I had the privilege of preaching at Christ's Covenant Church. I continued our series in Exodus, which is entitled "From Slavery to Sonship." You can find the audio of the message here.

Monday, August 01, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes the devil:
724. The devil is no doctor of theology, but he is experienced, and no one stands against him except Jesus Christ. The devil can imitate God and say [Matthew 4:9] "I will give you all these [all the kingdoms of the world] if you worship me." But Christ called him by his correct name [Matthew 4:10]: "Get yourself away from me Satan." (p. 320).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the value of the Psalms:
3416. One should always have the Psalms on hand and constantly and without interruption reflect upon them, because we can never adequately appreciate their splendor unless we read them diligently (p. 343).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, July 18, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes his Bible reading habits:
1877. The doctor said: For some years now, I have read the Bible through twice annually, and if I compare the Bible to a large and majestic tree, and all the words the small limbs, I can say I have knocked them all about to see what they were and what they meant. (p. 326).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, July 11, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the Lord's Prayer:
700. The Lord's Prayer binds people together, so that one prays for another and with another, for that reason it is strong and powerful, so that it banishes all evil and death itself (p. 320).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Wednesday, July 06, 2011

BibleWorks 9 Now Available

I have been an avid user of Bibleworks for the past 17 years (since version 3.0!). Over these past 17 years I have only grown more convinced that it is the premier exegetical software for studying Scripture. In God's providence I have had the privilege of becoming a certified Bibleworks trainer, conducting training workshops throughout the United States for students, professors and pastors. But even cooler than that is serving as a beta tester for a few of the versions, including the one they have just released--Bibleworks 9.

There are so many reasons I love this software. If you are unfamiliar with Bibleworks, the best place to begin is here. If you are already familiar with Bibleworks and are wondering what is new in this most recent release, check it out here. For more even more discussion of the new features in Bibleworks 9, be sure to check out the unofficial Bibleworks blog, where there is an ongoing series of posts covering the new features in detail. Among the most exciting additions are a quantum leap forward in tools for textual criticism, a new fourth column that expands the information you can display on the screen, and several new tabs within the Analysis Window. Included in the standard package is The New Moody Atlas of the Bible that includes high resolution maps and photos. Available as add-on modules are the ESV Study BibleReformed Dogmatics (4 Volume Set) by Herman Bavinck, and Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine by Wayne Grudem (for a full list of available add-on modules, see here). They even have the NIV2011. There is literally something for everyone in this latest release.

To whet your appetite, here is a short video that shows you Bibleworks 9 in action:



Here is an introductory video to Bibleworks 9:


There are ten more video clips available here.

Here are just a few of the endorsements, including my own:


Even better
BibleWorks 9 is an invaluable tool for studying the scriptures... I use BibleWorks every day, and BibleWorks 9 makes a great product even better!
Dr. Thomas Schreiner
Louisville, Kentucky
June 2011
9 is a 10!
Version 9 of BibleWorks is, well, a 10! The addition of the textual apparatus from the Center for New Testament Textual Studies is alone worth the upgrade, not only because of the astonishingly detailed information it provides, but also because of the masterful way in which that information has been integrated into the program -- and all of this at no extra cost. The inclusion (also at no extra cost) of the Moody Bible Atlas (with high-resolution images of its beautiful maps and photos) and the addition of various other enhacements and tools make this extraordinary program even more useful than before. I for one am a very grateful customer.
Mois├ęs Silva
Author and scholar
Translator for both the NAS and ESV bibles
June 2011
A giant leap forward
BW9 takes a giant leap forward in terms of opening up the world of textual variants and text criticism. A new database lets users access the major variants in every verse of the Greek New Testament. The manuscript witnesses for each variant are laid out in a chart displaying the manuscript's approximate date and type (that is, uncial, miniscule, etc.) for instant analysis of the witnesses. Even more exciting, the transcribed texts of the major uncial witnesses can be selected as display versions. I can read the critical text, Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, and others side-by-side, such that the historic witnesses come alive as real texts, and not just as symbols at the bottom of the page of the print edition of the critical text. These are also accessible through a new "manuscripts" tab in the analysis window, together with photographic images of select manuscripts.

The introduction of the fourth window dramatically enhances ease of use. Now I can have the window displaying multiple versions, the analysis window displaying lexical resources, and a browse window showing the verse in its full literary context all displayed across the screen. A new "use" feature provides gives me an instant book- or canon-wide concordance of any word under the cursor. That feature is an amazing time-saver.
David A. deSilva, Ph.D.
Trustees' Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek
Ashland Theological Seminary
June 2011
Prepare to be impressed!
The first time I opened BibleWorks 9 on my desktop, I felt like a kid on Christmas morning! An avid user of the last five versions of the program, I have long regarded BibleWorks as the gold standard for personal research and classroom use. If you're like me, then, you might wonder what more they could do. Prepare to be impressed! I noticed immediately that I had more choices at my fingertips, so that options available in earlier releases were more accessible. In fact, with the colorful, user-friendly toolbar, I was unsure whether I was now seeing, as if for the first time, tools and resources I had overlooked in previous versions. BibleWorks 9 introduces new text-critical resources – including the CNTTS apparatus, line-by-line comparison of mss., even images of some of the more important ones. This means I won't be moving back and forth between my computer screen and my hard copy of the Greek New Testament as before. I opened the new, second analysis window and found I could work on issues of grammar and usage (or any mix of possibilities) at the same time. Now I can simultaneously search the lexicon, study usage, and view a text in context – and that's only one combination of options available to me in this new configuration. A great resource for serious biblical studies just got better…
Joel B. Green, Ph.D.
Professor of New Testament Interpretation &
Associate Dean for the Center for Advanced Theological Studies
Fuller Theological Seminary
June 2011
Familiar and friendlier
BibleWorks9 is a significant and attractive upgrade. It offers an updated interface that will be familiar to existing users and friendlier for new ones. The BibleWorks Manuscript Project and the CNTTS NT Critical Apparatus modules are remarkable resources that will especially appeal to those interested in New Testament textual criticism. All users will enjoy the easier access and increased functionality provided with new features like the pop-out fourth column, the "Use" tab, and the instant difference highlighting. Considering the other texts and resources provided, BibleWorks9 is a comprehensive study package and tremendous value.
Mark GV Hoffman
Assoc. Prof. of Biblical Studies
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
June 2011
Hard to believe
If your goal is to understand the biblical text in light of careful study of the original languages, there is no better tool available than Bibleworks 9. It is an indispensable part of my study of Scripture, whether I am writing a commentary, working on a journal article, preparing a sermon, putting together a Sunday School lesson, or crafting a small group Bible study. I am so convinced of its value that I am now requiring my Greek students to use it for assignments.

In the past i have found it challenging to introduce Greek students to the field of textual criticism. But with the cutting edge advances now available in Bibleworks 9, I am eager to show them just how valuable it can be even for the busy pastor with limited time.

Once people begin to mine the riches of the CNTTS New Testament Critical Apparatus, they will wonder how they ever managed to survive with just the NA27 apparatus. Combined with the breathtaking Manuscript Project, Bibleworks 9 is now the tool of choice for those who want to do careful work in the manuscripts of the New Testament.

In the realm of Bible software, there is simply no better value than Bibleworks 9. To create a comparable set of resources in other software programs, you will pay 2-4 times as much. And in some cases you still won't be able to match what Bibleworks 9 offers. To put it bluntly, not only does Bibleworks 9 do things that no other Bible software program can do, it does so at a speed and cost that is frankly hard to believe.
Matthew S. Harmon
Professor of NT Studies
Grace College & Theological Seminary
June 2011


For ordering information, see here. There is special pricing available for upgrades from previous versions, and information about group discounts can be found here.

Monday, July 04, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther speaks of obedience to God and state:
1959. A Christian is bound by a dual obedience; obedience to God and obedience to authority. And this dual obedience comes into conflict only when the authorities command something that is against God's will. When that happens, one must obey God rather than man (p. 188).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the Word of God and describes the best way to preach it:
4812. The magnificence of the Word of God is never-ending and indescribable. We can never thank God enough for it. Human reason thinks thus: "Oh, I would walk to the end of the world if only I could hear the Lord our Creator here upon the earth!" Hear, dear brother, God the creator of heaven and earth does talk to you through His preachers. He baptizes, instructs and pronounces us free from sin through His Sacraments. And the Word of God is not to be compared to the words of Plato or Aristotle, but rather God Himself speaks. And the Word is best learned by the common people and youth when preached simply and plainly without the slightest obscurity or ambiguity, just as Christ taught through simple parables. And that is the best and most suitable manner for the congregation to hear the Word of God and never doubt the preacher. It is especially important when the people are not quite secure in their belief that the pastor speak simply, so he can help and guide them. For although God can certainly overcome opposition, he cannot tolerate confusion and contradiction. (p. 228).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, June 20, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther calls us to prayer:
"4579. Let us simply pray! For the Lord's Prayer is worth more than the entire world: Every single word conquers the entire world through its strength and fullness of expression. And he said that he prays a whole lot more in German than Latin, because the mother tongue is more effective." (p. 360).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther speaks of the hidden treasures of God:
"2433. The world neither acknowledges nor believes in the hidden treasures of God; it cannot be disputed that an obedient maid, a true diligent servant, and a child-bearing wife are far above a praying monk, who does not see beyond his grub; each, however, under the command and control of God." (p. 111).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Video Podcast: What is the Gospel? Part 2

As part of our church's Grow Initiative, we have begun selecting one book a quarter that we are encouraging our people to read. Because the gospel is so foundational, we began with Greg Gilbert's book What Is the Gospel?. The book does an excellent job of explaining in very simple but profound terms the basics of the gospel message. In his foreword to the book, D.A. Carson writes:
"This book does not so much claim to break new ground as survey afresh some old ground that should never have been ignored, much less abandoned...This book will sharpen the thinking of not a few mature Christians. More importantly, it is a book to distribute widely to church leaders, young Christians, and even some who have not yet trusted Christ who want a clear explanation of what the gospel is. Read it, then buy a box of them for generous distribution." (p. 14)
To help our people identify and digest key aspects of the book and its implications, several staff and I recorded a video podcast discussing the book. Here is part two of that podcast:



Monday, June 06, 2011

Mondays with Marty

In this week's installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains what best animates him to work:
"2410b. I find nothing that promotes work better than angry fervor; for when I wish to compose, write, pray and preach well, I must be angry. It refreshes my entire system, my mind is sharpened, and all the unpleasant thoughts and depression fade away" (p. 110).
DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.